10 March 2022

Historic Kimberley Pastoral Station Returned to Australian Hands

Springvale Station is set to return to Australian ownership with Harvest Road reaching an agreement to acquire the historic Kimberley property.

2 minute read
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The “Springvale Aggregation” consists of a total of approximately 604,430 hectares (1,493,560 acres), comprising four pastoral leases: Springvale, Mable Downs, Alice Downs, and Texas Downs.

Springvale Station is located in the East Kimberley region, about 70 kilometres north of Halls Creek and 320 kilometres south of Kununurra.

The iconic property has the capacity to breed a large number of calves that will suit the Harvest Road fully integrated beef supply chain in Western Australia, suitable for domestic processing and consumption, as well as export meat sales.

The property has traditionally been well developed with historic infrastructure including the original homestead that was built by legendary cattle and horseman Tom Quilty. The aggregation also includes staff quarters, sheds and 10 sets of permanent cattle yards.

Springvale Aggregation boasts many natural water holes and extensive water infrastructure, some water points have recently been upgraded with new solar pumping systems and a replacement trough program is underway.

Once acquired, included in the purchase will be licences, permits and basic infrastructure to operate a “glamping” style tourism business on the road into the world-famous Bungle Bungle National Park.

Harvest Road, the diversified agri-business of Andrew and Nicola Forrest, which includes the Harvey Beef brand, already has a historical connection to the property. The current aggregation was put together by E. G. Green and Sons, who owned Harvey Beef, and was an important part of their supply chain in the 1980s and 1990s.

Tattarang Chief Investment Officer John Hartman said Springvale Aggregation will form an important part of Harvest Road’s integrated supply chain, while maintaining an unwavering commitment to the highest possible standards of animal welfare and environmental stewardship.

“Harvest Road is looking forward to becoming a member of the East Kimberley community and contributing further to the future of the Australian pastoral industry, and we’re also excited about the opportunity to support tourism in this iconic region,” Mr Hartman said.

Harvest Road’s Chief Operating Officer Pastoral, Backgrounding and Feeding Facility Ben Dwyer thanked previous owners, the Yeeda Pastoral Company, and said the purchase of Springvale Aggregation will be another long-term investment in the future of Western Australia’s beef industry.

“The acquisition of Springvale will continue our commitment to developing a vertically integrated beef supply chain across the State,” Mr Dwyer said.

“We will focus on the sustainability of the property by destocking appropriately to leave a well-selected breeding herd and to build a strong genetic base for our supply chain, as well as allow the country a well-deserved rest,” he said.

Yeeda Pastoral Company Chairman Mervyn Key said the company has been privileged to be the custodian of the Springvale Aggregation for the past 20 years.

“We are very happy to be handing the reins on to Harvest Road to bring the station back to its former position as an iconic breeding property and build on the potential of the Kimberley pastoral industry,” Mr Key said.

The planned transaction by Harvest Road is subject to approval by the Western Australian Minister for Lands, among other required approvals.

A company of Tattarang, Harvest Road is one of Australia’s largest and most diverse agri-food businesses. The Group’s beef division – which includes the Harvey Beef brand – is the state’s largest beef processor and owns a state-of-the-art processing facility in Harvey.